Due to the lapse in Congressional Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2019, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is closed. HUD websites will not be updated until further notice. For more information, see HUD Contingency Plan for Possible Lapse in Appropriations.
Header Image for Print
Dataset Banner Image

Components of Inventory Change (CINCH) reports

The Components of Inventory Change (CINCH) report measures changes in the characteristics of the housing stock of the United States. Using data collected from the national American Housing Survey (AHS), conducted every two years, the characteristics of individual housing units are compared across time. This comparison allows researchers to see not only changes in the characteristics of housing units, but also in the characteristics of occupants. Information is available on the characteristics of units added and removed from the housing stock.

First-time users of this publication are advised to refer to the Appendices and notes immediately preceding the tables for explanations of the columns and how to interpret the results. The Appendices also contain the definitions of all of the characteristics, cautions, and explanations about some of the results.

Each report has two sections. The first section, labeled "Losses," shows the losses to the housing stock in the two-year period using the first year as the base year. In other words, the first section shows the disposition of all the units that were present at the beginning of the period. The second section, labeled "Gains," shows the gains in the housing stock during the two-year period, using the second year of the period as the base year. That is to say, the second section shows the source of all the units that were present at the end of the period.

The "Summary of Components of Inventory Change: 1985-1995" document is a compilation of the five two-year reports

All of the reports are based on the American Housing Survey national sample. The results presented here are not directly comparable to the Census Bureau publications "Components of Inventory Change: 1980-1991," or "Components of Inventory Change: 1980-1993."




2011-2013 CINCH and Rental Dynamics

 

 

 

 


CINCH reports based on the 2011 AHS Metropolitan Survey

Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 1998-2011

Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 2002-2011

Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 2004-2011

Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 2009-2011

 

Datasets

Related Link

Weighting Strategy for 2011 Metropolitan CINCH Analysis (*.pdf, 1.1 MB)


CINCH reports based on the 2007 AHS Metropolitan Survey

Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 1998-2007

 

Weighting Strategy for 2007 Metropolitan CINCH Analysis (*.pdf, 381 KB)
Listing of Programs and Variables Used in Metropolitan CINCH and Rental Dynamics Analysis for 1998/2002 and 2007 American Housing Surveys (*.pdf, 58 KB)

Datasets


2003-2005 CINCH and Rental Dynamics

CINCH reports based on the 2004 AHS Metropolitan survey

    Housing analysts use two techniques--Components of Inventory Change (CINCH) and rental market dynamics--to look at a housing market at two points in time and explain how the observed changes came about in physical (bricks and mortar) terms. CINCH focuses first on the overall number and then the characteristics of units at different times. Using CINCH methods, analysts answer such question as: What happened to the x units that disappeared from the housing stock between the beginning and the end of the period? or Where did the increase in owner-occupied units come from? Rental market dynamics, which is really a type of CINCH analysis, focuses on the rental market with particular emphasis on the affordability of rental housing. Using rental market dynamics techniques, analysts answer such questions as: Have the number of rental units affordable to households with very low incomes increased or decreased over the period? or What happened to the units that were affordable to low-income households at the beginning of the period?

    Previously HUD commissioned CINCH and rental market dynamics analyses using the national American Housing Survey (AHS). This series of reports focuses on the 13 metropolitan housing markets surveyed in the 2004 American Housing Survey, comparing each with the year it was previously surveyed, either 1994 or 1995.

    You may also download a SAS dataset (*.exe) and an ASCII dataset (*.exe) that you can link to the regular AHS data files to produce custom tabulations of CINCH and rental market dynamics.

    Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 1994-2004

  • Atlanta (*.pdf, 1.01MB)
  • Cleveland (*.pdf, 1.01 MB)
  • Denver (*.pdf, 1.01 MB)
  • Hartford (*.pdf, 997 KB)
  • Indianapolis (*.pdf, 1.02 MB)
  • Memphis (*.pdf, 1.1 MB)
  • New Orleans (*.pdf, 1.1 MB)
  • Oklahoma City (*.pdf, 1.15 MB)
  • Pittsburgh (*.pdf, 1.05 MB)
  • Sacramento (*.pdf, 1.05 MB)
  • San Antonio (*.pdf, 1.00 MB)
  • Seattle (*.pdf, 1.10 MB)
  • St. Louis (*.pdf, 1.05 MB)
  • CINCH Weighting Strategy (*.pdf, 102 KB)



2001-2003 CINCH and Rental Dynamics

CINCH reports based on the 2002 AHS Metropolitan survey

    Housing analysts use two techniques--Components of Inventory Change (CINCH) and rental market dynamics--to look at a housing market at two points in time and explain how the observed changes came about in physical (bricks and mortar) terms. CINCH focuses first on the overall number and then the characteristics of units at different times. Using CINCH methods, analysts answer such question as: What happened to the x units that disappeared from the housing stock between the beginning and the end of the period? or Where did the increase in owner-occupied units come from? Rental market dynamics, which is really a type of CINCH analysis, focuses on the rental market with particular emphasis on the affordability of rental housing. Using rental market dynamics techniques, analysts answer such questions as: Have the number of rental units affordable to households with very low incomes increased or decreased over the period? or What happened to the units that were affordable to low-income households at the beginning of the period?

    Previously HUD commissioned CINCH and rental market dynamics analyses using the national American Housing Survey (AHS). This series of reports focuses on the 13 metropolitan housing markets surveyed in the 2002 American Housing Survey, comparing each with the year it was previously surveyed, either 1994 or 1995.

    You may also download a SAS dataset (*.zip) and an ASCII dataset (*.zip) that you can link to the regular AHS data files to produce custom tabulations of CINCH and rental market dynamics.

    Components of Inventory Change and Rental Market Dynamics: 1994–2002

  • Anaheim-Santa Ana (*.pdf, 1.56 MB)
  • Buffalo (*.pdf, 1.51 MB)
  • Charlotte (*.pdf, 912 KB)
  • Columbus (*.pdf, 902 KB)
  • Dallas (*.pdf, 923 KB)
  • Fort Worth-Arlington (*.pdf, 911 KB)
  • Kansas City (*.pdf, 900 KB)
  • Miami-Ft. Lauderdale (*.pdf, 928 KB)
  • Milwaukee (*.pdf, 911 KB)
  • Phoenix (*.pdf, 922 KB)
  • Portland (*.pdf, 914 KB)
  • Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario (*.pdf, 921 KB)
  • San Diego (*.pdf, 929 KB)
  • Weighing for CINCH and Rental Dynamics Analysis: Logic of the Weighting and Final Algorithms (*.pdf, 211 KB)