HUD USER offers a selection of our most popular housing research in a variety of eBook-friendly formats. We invite you to browse our inventory and download titles of interest. New titles will be added on an ongoing basis, so be sure to check back often for new releases. For assistance, please see the Help section or email us at helpdesk@huduser.gov.


Recent Releases


Cityscape: The Fair Housing Act at 50 Volume 21, Number 1Cityscape: The Fair Housing Act at 50 Volume 21, Number 1

The goal of Cityscape is to bring high-quality original research on housing and community development issues to scholars, government officials, and practitioners. Cityscape is open to all relevant disciplines, including architecture, consumer research, demography, economics, engineering, ethnography, finance, geography, law, planning, political science, public policy, regional science, sociology, statistics, and urban studies. Cityscape is published three times a year by the Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Building Even Better Homes: Strategies for Promoting Innovation in Home BuildingBuilding Even Better Homes: Strategies for Promoting Innovation in Home Building

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has a long history of investing in a more innovative and productive homebuilding industry. This report provides an update to the 2003 RAND report, Building Better Homes: Government Strategies for Promoting Innovation in Housing, to better reflect the current understanding and practice of innovation in housing and identify the most useful Federal role for promoting such innovation. Consistent with the original report, the research team examined the structure, characteristics, and motivations within the homebuilding industry that either advance or hinder research and development (R&D), and the diffusion and adoption of housing innovations. The authors propose a new non-linear model of the innovation process that is realistic and appropriate to housing. The report outlines information-gathering and analytic activities needed to inform federal innovation policy and principles that should guide selection of policies for supporting housing technology innovation in public-private context, and strategies to increase the impact of federal R&D investments.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Promoting Work and Self-Sufficiency for Housing Voucher Recipients: Early Findings From the Family Self-Sufficiency Program EvaluationPromoting Work and Self-Sufficiency for Housing Voucher Recipients: Early Findings From the Family Self-Sufficiency Program Evaluation

In 2012, HUD commissioned a national random assignment evaluation of the Family-Self Sufficiency (FSS) program's impacts on labor market and other quality of life outcomes for households receiving Housing Choice Vouchers (HCVs). The FSS program has two key components: i) funding for Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) to support case managers who work with participant households to develop individualized self-sufficiency plans and access other community services, and ii) funding to support savings and asset development via interest-bearing escrow accounts redeemable upon graduation from the program, generally after 5 years of FSS program participation. This report examines FSS program implementation, participants' engagement in the program, and program impacts on labor force participation and government benefits receipt in the first 24 months after program enrollment. The evaluation finds that while FSS increased participation in a range of employment-related services and support services by a statistically significant 13 percentage points, participants in the FSS program did not increase employment rates or average earnings in the first 2 years, but did experience small shifts from part-time to full-time employment.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Deriving Local Trend Factors for Fair Market Rent EstimationDeriving Local Trend Factors for Fair Market Rent Estimation

In the fall of 2018, PD&R tasked a multidisciplinary research team to explore ways to refine HUD's current methodology, particularly as it relates to calculating a trend factor, to address public and Congressional concerns. The first phase (Phase I) of the study presents a statistical approach for deriving local trend factors for selected areas where local Consumer Price Index (CPI) data is available for use in the calculation of FMRs by expanding on HUD's existing methodology for estimating a national trend factor and applying it to CPI data for the 13 metropolitan and 4 regional areas of two different size classes produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The second phase (Phase II) of the report presents alternative approaches to augmenting local market conditions into calculations of FMRs for a broader range of metropolitan areas by utilizing alternative sources of data and empirical frameworks.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Evaluation of the HUD-DOJ Pay for Success Permanent Supportive Housing Demonstration Baseline ReportEvaluation of the HUD-DOJ Pay for Success Permanent Supportive Housing Demonstration Baseline Report

The U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Justice (DOJ) launched the Pay for Success Permanent Supportive Housing Demonstration in 2016. HUD-DOJ are conducting a formative evaluation to assess whether providing permanent supportive housing (PSH) within a pay-for-success (PFS) framework is a successful and cost-effective way of using PSH to provide housing stability and reduce social service use and recidivism for a population continually cycling between homeless services and the criminal justice system. PFS is an innovative financing model that leverages philanthropic and private dollars to provide up-front financing, with the government paying after they generate results, i.e. "pay for success." This baseline report covers the initial grant implementation period from October 2016 through December 2017 and contributes to research on how communities are working to launch PFS projects to fund PSH for the reentry population experiencing chronic homelessness. It describes the implementation of PFS across seven sites during the first 14 months of the Demonstration. The 7 Demonstration sites started at different stages, and 6 of the 7 sites confronted different challenges and achieved different milestones as they advanced to the next PFS stage.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Understanding Encampments of People Experiencing Homelessness and Community Responses: Emerging Evidence as of Late 2018Understanding Encampments of People Experiencing Homelessness and Community Responses: Emerging Evidence as of Late 2018

This paper documents what is known about homeless encampments as of late 2018, based on a review of the limited literature produced by academic and research institutions and public agencies, supplemented by interviews with key informants. This paper is part of a larger research study, sponsored jointly by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of Policy Development and Research and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. The goal is to contribute to the understanding of homelessness, including the characteristics of homeless encampments and the people who stay in them, and of local responses addressing encampments and their associated costs. The larger final research report is anticipated January 2020.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Addressing Housing Affordability in High-Cost Metropolitan Areas in the United StatesAddressing Housing Affordability in High-Cost Metropolitan Areas in the United States

The Senate Report 115-268, Transportation and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, 2018, requested that HUD investigate the rental housing affordability crisis in high-cost metropolitan areas and recommend potential solutions to help states and their local government entities. This report summarizes the nation’s rental affordability problem, identifies metropolitan areas with the greatest affordability challenges, and offers recommendations for what these communities can do to alleviate shortages of affordable rental housing. The report also highlights a select number of exemplary approaches that some of these high-cost communities have already implemented to address the affordability crisis.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Evidence Matters Winter 2019Evidence Matters Winter 2019

First used in the 1970s, housing vouchers — beginning as the Section 8 program and now as the Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program — have become HUD’s primary means for providing housing assistance to low-income renters. The HCV program subsidizes rental payments for privately owned units, making the landlords who own these homes critical to the program’s success. Despite their important role in supplying affordable housing, landlords have not been the subject of much research until recently. Current HUD-sponsored research is beginning to fill some of the gaps in our knowledge about how and why landlords choose to accept vouchers. This knowledge should help HUD, public housing agencies (PHAs), and local government entities improve the efforts they are already implementing to increase landlord participation. This issue of Evidence Matters focuses on the research regarding landlord acceptance of vouchers, the efforts to increase participation, and the implications of landlord participation for the housing choices of voucher households.

The lead article, “Landlords: Critical Participants in the Housing Choice Voucher Program,” provides a basic overview of the HCV program and the role that landlords play in it; examines the implications of voucher acceptance for assisted households; surveys existing research on landlord participation; and provides examples of the types of program and initiatives that HUD, PHAs, and local governments are pursuing to increase voucher acceptance. The Research Spotlight, “HUD-Sponsored Research Sheds New Light on HCV Landlords,” by Meena Bavan and Paul Joice, discusses the findings of two recent HUD-sponsored studies, “A Pilot Study of Landlord Acceptance of Housing Choice Vouchers,” and “Urban Landlords and the Housing Choice Voucher Program: A Research Report.” Finally, the In Practice article, “PHAs Encourage Landlord Participation With Incentives,” discusses initiatives in Marin County, California, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, that offer financial benefits, education, and streamlined administrative processes to encourage landlords to lease to voucher holders.

We hope that this edition of Evidence Matters provides a helpful overview of this critical topic. Our next issue will focus on tax incentives. Please provide feedback on any of our issues at www.huduser.gov/forums.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Landlord Participation StudyLandlord Participation Study

The Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program is the largest rental housing subsidy program in the United States and has the potential to increase housing options for low-income families. In order to realize this potential, however, the program must attract landlords who accept housing choice vouchers. The primary objectives of this study are: 1) to provide insights from Public Housing Authority (PHA) staff on the factors associated with landlord decisions about whether to participate in the program; and 2) to identify a collection of promising and innovative practices that PHAs have used to increase landlord participation. The study provides key insights into landlord participation in the HCV program and the perspectives of PHA staff on factors influencing landlord decisions on whether to participate. The study also identifies a diverse collection of innovative activities adopted by PHAs to mitigate financial concerns among landlords, make the HCV program simpler, and alleviate landlord concerns about HCV tenants. The study finds that a majority of PHA staff interviewed identified financial reasons as the most important factor affecting landlord participation - with payment standards and fair market rents, damage costs and security deposits, and profit motivations cited as key determining factors.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Data Use and Challenges in Using Pay for Success to Implement Permanent Supportive Housing: Lessons From the HUD-DOJ DemonstrationData Use and Challenges in Using Pay for Success to Implement Permanent Supportive Housing: Lessons From the HUD-DOJ Demonstration

The U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Justice (DOJ) launched the Pay for Success Permanent Supportive Housing Demonstration in 2016. HUD-DOJ are conducting a formative evaluation to assess whether providing permanent supportive housing (PSH) within a pay-for-success (PFS) framework is a successful and cost-effective way of using PSH to provide housing stability and reduce social service use and recidivism for a population continually cycling between homeless services and the criminal justice system. PFS is an innovative financing model that leverages philanthropic and private dollars to provide up-front financing, with the government paying after they generate results, i.e. “pay for success.”
The current formative evaluation deliverables include a Research Brief that documents the challenges faced by the grantees and their solutions. This Research Brief documents data challenges that arose in four areas: stakeholders, data quality, privacy, and timeliness of data. Although data challenges played a role in lengthening feasibility analyses beyond the anticipated 1-year timeline, many of the seven sites in the HUD-DOJ PFS Demonstration made important progress in bringing stakeholders to the table to support data access, negotiating privacy concerns and data sharing agreements, and problem-solving data quality issues or delays in data access.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Small Area Fair Market Rent Demonstration Evaluation: Final ReportSmall Area Fair Market Rent Demonstration Evaluation: Final Report

This groundbreaking report evaluates the impact of implementing Small Area Fair Market Rents (SAFMRs) in seven Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) in a variety of geographic and market types. This report examines whether and to what extent the shift from metropolitan-wide Fair Market Rents (FMRs) to ZIP Code-based SAFMRs provides better access to areas of higher opportunity for Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) families. The report also examines how the use of SAFMRs affects HCV families and landlords, as well as the impact of SAFMRS on Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) paid by HUD and the tenant portion of rent paid by SAFMR families. This report also reviews the PHA administrative procedures imposed and costs incurred in implementing SAFMRs.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats: Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Understanding Rapid Re-housing: Systematic Review of Rapid Re-housing Outcomes LiteratureUnderstanding Rapid Re-housing: Systematic Review of Rapid Re-housing Outcomes Literature

The primary goal of rapid re-housing (RRH) is to provide temporary assistance that quickly moves individuals and families who experience literal homelessness into permanent housing while providing appropriate time-limited supports to help them stabilize there (National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2014a). Guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) in 2012 specifies three core components for RRH programs: (1) housing identification, (2) rent and move-in assistance, and (3) case management and services. This systematic review of RRH outcomes literature summarizes the available evidence on rapid rehousing with a specific focus on how rapid re-housing programs have performed in relation to performance benchmarks. This report also presents descriptive information on the design and implementation of RRH programs, drawing on the research literature and on the authors’ knowledge of RRH practice.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Understanding Rapid Re-housing: Supplemental Analysis of Data from the Family Options StudyUnderstanding Rapid Re-housing: Supplemental Analysis of Data from the Family Options Study

Rapid re-housing programs provide temporary assistance to individuals and families who experience homelessness so they may quickly move into permanent housing and stabilize there (National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2014). Since 2009, the number of communities in the United States using rapid re-housing (RRH) programs to address homelessness has grown from just a few to several hundred. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is sponsoring the Understanding Rapid Re-housing Study to address important questions about RRH assistance. To carry out the study, Abt Associates is synthesizing the current body of research available on RRH, conducting new analysis of existing data, and collecting new data to analyze current RRH program designs and households’ experiences using RRH assistance.This paper is the deliverable for Task 6 of the Understanding Rapid Re-housing Study. The paper presents new analysis about short-term rent subsidies and associated services provided by rapid re-housing programs using data collected for the Family Options Study.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Cityscape: Youth Homelessness Volume 20, Number 3Cityscape: Youth Homelessness Volume 20, Number 3

The goal of Cityscape is to bring high-quality original research on housing and community development issues to scholars, government officials, and practitioners. Cityscape is open to all relevant disciplines, including architecture, consumer research, demography, economics, engineering, ethnography, finance, geography, law, planning, political science, public policy, regional science, sociology, statistics, and urban studies. Cityscape is published three times a year by the Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Who Participates in Homebuyer Education and Counseling Services and Why? Insights From HUD’s First-Time Homebuyer Education and Counseling DemonstrationWho Participates in Homebuyer Education and Counseling Services and Why? Insights From HUD’s First-Time Homebuyer Education and Counseling Demonstration

Congress and many researchers and practitioners in the field of housing counseling have asked whether pre-purchase homeownership counseling for first-time borrowers leads to better borrower outcomes and reduced lender risk relative to no counseling. HUD designed The First-Time Homebuyer Education and Counseling Demonstration as a large-scale randomized experiment to answer the question about the relative efficacy of homebuyer education and counseling on first-time borrowers. Because of the richness of the data collected on study participants at baseline and during the service participation period of the Demonstration, a detailed analysis of the study participants’ personal characteristics that are associated with program participation in – both initiation and completion of – in-person and remote homebuyer education and counseling services was possible. Key findings from Who Participates in Homebuyer Education and Counseling Services and Why? Insights from HUD’s First-Time Homebuyer Education and Counseling Demonstration indicate that women and homebuyers with greater education were more likely to participate in homebuyer education and counseling services in general. Those at an early stage of the homebuying process, those who reported being “pretty good at math,” or those who planned to purchase a home without a co-borrower were more likely to participate in in-person services. Those who planned to spend more years living in their purchased home, who scored better on a baseline mortgage literacy quiz, or who had a higher credit score were more likely to participate in remote services. This paper provides data that can inform how HUD’s Housing Counseling Program and service providers market and deliver homebuyer education and counseling services, and serves as a useful basis for readers to assess the ultimate findings of the Demonstration that will be forthcoming in future reports.



Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF

Interface of Mobility and Sustainability: Thompson v. HUD Volume 1: Findings Final ReportInterface of Mobility and Sustainability: Thompson v. HUD Volume 1: Findings Final Report

This study satisfied the 6 research objectives specified in the Final Settlement Agreement from Thompson v. HUD, a landmark public housing segregation lawsuit. Inadditon to the six objectives that guided this research, the Settlement Agreement provided for housing choice vouchers (HCV) for the plaintiff class (African American public housing residents) to move to “opportunity” communities.



Learn More >>

Download eBook formats:Get Mobi ReaderMobi | Get Adobe ReaderePub | Get Adobe Reader PDF


 

 

Search by Categories


Browse the eBookstore

 
>