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The goal of Cityscape is to bring high-quality original research on housing and community development issues to scholars, government officials, and practitioners. Cityscape is open to all relevant disciplines, including architecture, consumer research, demography, economics, engineering, ethnography, finance, geography, law, planning, political science, public policy, regional science, sociology, statistics, and urban studies.

Cityscape is published three times a year by the Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.


 
  • National Survey of Mortgage Originations
  • Volume 21 Number 2
  • Managing Editor: Mark D. Shroder
  • Associate Editor: Michelle P. Matuga
 

National Survey of Mortgage Originations Survey Data on Your Home Loan Toolkit

Brian Bucks
Tim Critchfield
Susan Singer
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Disclaimer
The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau or the U.S. Government.


The Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) requires that consumers who apply for a mortgage to purchase a home receive certain information on real estate settlement services and related costs. Before 2015, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) published a booklet titled Shopping for Your Home Loan: Settlement Cost Booklet (Booklet), which lenders provided to mortgage applicants. Starting in October 2015, coincident with the implementation of new mortgage loan estimate and closing disclosure forms, lenders began providing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s substantially revised publication, the “Your Home Loan Toolkit” (Toolkit) (CFPB, n.d.1).

This article details the extent to which mortgage applicants recalled getting the Toolkit. Because the Toolkit is required only for purchase mortgages, the analysis considers purchase-mortgage borrowers’ recollection of receiving the Booklet or the Toolkit. We find that the percentage of homebuyers who remember receiving the information increased with the introduction of the new Toolkit. The estimated marginal effects are statistically significant and large compared with other factors.


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