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The Secretary’s Award for Public-Philanthropic Partnerships - Housing and Community Development in Action

The Secretary’s Awards for Public-Philanthropic Partnerships recognize excellence in partnerships that have both transformed the relationships between the sectors and led to measurable benefits in housing and community development, including increased economic development, health, safety, education, workforce development, disaster resilience, inclusivity and cultural opportunities, innovative regional approaches, and/or housing access for low- and moderate-income families.


Call For Entries

Apply now for the 2019 Secretary’s Awards for Public-Philanthropic Partnerships!
Deadline: Monday, January 14, 2019

Download 2019 Application Download 2019 Informational Brochure




About the 2018 Award
 

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, in partnership with the Council on Foundations, announce the Secretary’s Awards for Public-Philanthropic Partnerships to be awarded at a convening at HUD Headquarters in Washington, DC in July 2018. The Secretary’s Awards for Public-Philanthropic Partnerships recognize excellence in partnerships that have both transformed the relationships between the sectors and led to measurable benefits in terms of increased economic development, health, safety, education, disaster resilience, inclusivity and cultural opportunities, and/or housing access for low- and moderate-income families.

Estimated giving by the nation’s more than 86,700 foundations totaled $60 billion in 2014 alone, with total foundation assets estimated at just over $865 billion (Foundation Center, 2014). Not only do foundations provide valuable financial resources for non-profit providers, but they also are led by a board of trustees and staff who provide expert knowledge of the challenges and opportunities faced by the communities they serve. These human resources facilitate the capacity of foundations to provide leadership on issues like housing and community development. By strengthening the connection between the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and philanthropy, these awards highlight the power of collective impact that can be achieved through public-philanthropic partnerships between government entities and foundations.

Download the Composite Award Winners Document


Anthem Foundation
 
Challenge

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer and increases risks for stroke, heart disease, and other cancers throughout the body. In February 2017, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced a rule requiring all federally-owned public housing to adopt and implement a smoke-free policy. HUD strongly recommends that local public housing authorities provide smoking cessation resources to residents, and Anthem Foundation and American Lung Association are helping make that possible.

Innovation

The Smoking Cessation for Low-Income Housing Residents Initiative was introduced by Anthem Foundation and the American Lung Association to address this critical health need and help the residents in public housing go smoke free by the July 31, 2018, effective date. With a grant from Anthem Foundation, the American Lung Association’s Freedom From Smoking is being made available to residents across 685,000 housing units.

Freedom From Smoking is the industry-recognized “gold standard” of smoking cessation programs. The program is shared through in-person group clinics led by a trained facilitator who delivers a robust assortment of curriculum and selfhelp resources. Cornerstone to the program model is forging strong partnerships with local community organizations that specifically reach low-income residents. More than 200 targeted local partners have joined the initiative. By engaging with local community partners, the initiative is training hundreds of facilitators to deliver Freedom From Smoking to residents in need. This program model is leading the way for others to collectively engage and leverage community resources to help individuals quit smoking and break the intergenerational cycle of addiction faced by our children exposed to the effects of smoking.

Public-Sector Partners:
City, County, and State Health Departments; City, County, and State Housing Authorities; State Smoking Quitlines; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Other Partners:
Smokefree Coalitions; Affordable Housing Coalitions; community health event organizers

Contact Information:
Leah Birk (Leah.Birk@anthem.com)

Download the Award Information


Bon Secours of Maryland Foundation
 
Challenge

In West Baltimore, the deep poverty experienced by residents has created conditions that undermine the health, economic, and educational success of families in the area. Conditions in the target area for this project, zip code 21223, are particularly dire. The area also establishes the lower extremes for health disparities in the City and the State across all major chronic illnesses.

Innovation

Future Baltimore is a flagship partnership for West Baltimore and the result of the innovative and equityfocused collaboration between Bon Secours Baltimore Health System and Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic States. Typically market competitors, the two organizations joined forces to deliver nine new and expanded programs specifically tailored to meet the dire socio-economic needs of the 21223-area.

The Future Baltimore partnership was initiated in 2016 with a planning grant from Kaiser Permanente to Bon Secours. Future Baltimore includes nine programs which are Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)/ Geriatric Nursing Assistant (GNA) Training Program, Bon Secours Returning Citizens Program, Urban Agriculture and Food Delivery Program, Frederick Elementary School-Community Schools Model Implementation, Community Health Worker Model, Behavioral Health Works Onsite Mental Health Assessment Tool, First Responder Trauma Informed Care Training, Targeted Neighborhood (21223) Economic Development Assessment, and Business Incubator Model. With this robust level of support, each of the existing programs is demonstrating powerful outcomes. For example, in less than a year the program had 42 CNA/GNA graduates obtaining healthcare certifications. Additionally, the Returning Citizens Program has graduated 48 residents. All participants have been screened using the new Behavior Health Works Mental Health Assessment.

Public-Sector Partners:
Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore Police Department, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, Office of the Mayor

Other Partners:
Kaiser Permanente & Anchor Group (Community Associations: Boyd- Booth, Fayette Street Outreach, Franklin Square; and Churches: Celebration Church at Monroe St., Central Baptist Church & The Tabernacle of The Lord Church)

Contact Information:
Talib Horne (Talib_Horne@bshsi.org)

Download the Award Information


Conrad N. Hilton Foundation
 
Challenge

Education is the key to economic well-being and personal success. There is a shocking disparity however between the number of foster youth who aspire to a college-level education and those who achieve this goal. While 90% have a goal of attending and graduating from college, only an estimated 8% of foster youth successfully go on to receive a degree nationwide as compared to 47% of the general population.

Innovation

Using a collective impact model that engages partners from both the public and private sectors, California College Pathways (CCP) is helping foster youth across the state achieve their higher education goals and move on to fulfilling careers. Partners have worked collaboratively to expand direct support for foster youth enrolled in college, streamline the transition from high school to college for foster youth, and implement policy changes that facilitate project goals.

Achievements have included the establishment of an intersegmental data sharing system, expansion of the Chafee Employment and Training voucher program, the only publicly funded source of financial aid designated for foster youth, and the creation of a state sponsored foster youth support program at 41 community colleges throughout the state. Through partnerships between local philanthropy and California’s public post-secondary, child welfare and K-12 education systems, along with the determination and the perseverance of youth themselves, California College Pathways has helped thousands of foster youth succeed in college and contribute to their local communities. CCP continues to assist colleges to expand support for foster youth, serve as a clearinghouse for information, and advocate for statewide and regional policy changes that support CCP goals. The allocation of close to $20 million in new ongoing state funding and the embedding of programs within individual public institutions ensures a long-lasting impact for years to come.

Public-Sector Partners:
California Department of Education, California Community College Chancellor’s Office

Other Partners:
Stuart and Walter S. Johnson Foundations, John Burton Advocates for Youth

Contact Information:
Jeannine Balfour (Jeannine@HiltonFoundation.org)

Download the Award Information


Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
 
Challenge

To expand high-quality early learning opportunities for children ages birth to five in Flint, Michigan. The need is particularly urgent among children who may have been exposed to lead as a result of the city’s water crisis.

Innovation

Believing that all children deserve an equal chance to succeed, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation has led a variety of robust cross-sector partnerships, involving more than 25 organizations and agencies, in crafting an innovative, sustainable and systems-based approach to increasing the availability and quality of early childhood education in the Foundation’s hometown of Flint.

As a result of the partnerships, two new full-day, full-year centers currently are providing high-quality early learning and wraparound services for 368 infants, toddlers and preschoolers, as well as supportive services for their families. The centers will serve as hubs of early childhood education in Flint, helping to strengthen the quality of early learning throughout the community by offering service models, training and other resources to parents, caregivers and providers. Formal linkages between the centers and a national network of providers, researchers, advocates and other early learning champions will support the ongoing exchange of successful models and promising practices. Additionally, a public-philanthropic collaborative is in place to help identify, support and advance opportunities to further improve and expand early childhood education in Flint. A rigorous, long-term evaluation of this approach and its physical, behavioral and cognitive impacts for students is planned. The project partners are hopeful that, through continued innovation and demonstrated outcomes, the work in Flint will serve as a pilot for other communities and contribute nationally to a deeper understanding of — and support for — quality early childhood education.

Public-Sector Partners:
Flint Community Schools; Genesee Intermediate School District; State of Michigan — Department of Education, Department of Technology, Management and Budget, and Office of the Governor; Michigan State University; University of Michigan-Flint; and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children & Families, Office of Head Start Region V

Other Partners:
Community Foundation of Greater Flint; Educare Learning Network; Local Initiatives Support Corporation; PNC Bank; Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation; United Way of Genesee County; W.K. Kellogg Foundation and others

Contact Information:
Kathryn A. Thomas (kthomas@mott.org)

Download the Award Information


Greater Cedar Rapids Community Foundation
 
Challenge

Cedar Rapids suffered a catastrophic flood in 2008 that inundated 10 square miles of the city, including the downtown business district and surrounding low to moderate income neighborhoods. In the years following the flood, new partnerships have been formed to work on this issue. Over time, this has grown into an effort to engage lower income and diverse communities in business development and entrepreneurial activities. However, access to capital has been an issue.

Innovation

Thanks to a collaborative effort, entrepreneurs are now being connected with the capital and resources they need to get started. The Cedar Rapids MICRO program, a diverse publicprivate partnership, allows individuals to borrow up to $10,000 for 3 years at 4 percent interest. Assistance is provided to the applicants for market research, development of a business plan, and completion of the loan application. Once the application is approved, resources are in place to continue to support the participant throughout the life of the loan.

The overall goal of MICRO is to support entrepreneurs and small business development, allowing a mechanism for Cedar Rapids to connect the “arc of opportunity” with the “arc of prosperity” that is referenced in a recent Federal Reserve study that included Cedar Rapids. MICRO has a highly public contact point for the program at the public library. Librarians have been specially trained to help guide would be entrepreneurs through the process of market research and finding expert resources, including the Kirkwood Small Business Development Center and the local SCORE chapter. Both aid in the development of a business plan and the completion of the loan application. Once the loan is approved, arrangements are made for a SCORE volunteer to mentor the participant. The regional planning agency, the East Central Iowa Council of Governments, administers the program.

Public-Sector Partners:
City of Cedar Rapids, Cedar Rapids Public Library, Kirkwood Small Business Development Center, East Central Iowa Council of Governments

Other Partner:
Local SCORE chapter

Contact Information:
Jean Brenneman (jean.brenneman@gcrcf.org)

Download the Award Information


U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities
 
Challenge

African American landowners have faced multiple barriers to land retention including unclear title due to heirs’ property, smaller land holdings, and a mistrust of the forest industry and federal programs. Additionally, without realizing the economic value of their land, landowners often perceive their property as a liability to maintain, rather than an asset to keep.

Innovation

The Sustainable Forestry & African American Land Retention Program (SFLR) is a partnership of the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDA Forest Service that promotes intergenerational land retention and family asset creation for African American landowners across the southeast. The program capitalizes on innovative partnerships between local, state, and federal organizations to assist landowners in land retention and asset creation. The program provides a variety of support to these landowners, including access to legal assistance and opportunities for sustainable forestry.

The Program arose from recognizing seven historical barriers to African American participation in sustainable forestry practices: 1) weak support systems for landowners; 2) limited access to forestry markets; 3) insecure land tenure due to heirs’ property and limited succession planning; 4) limited access to capital; 5) diminished forest health; 6) broken trust among landowners, private foresters, and natural resources programs; and 7) limited return on investment for forest management. SFLR works to overcome these barriers by connecting landowners to comprehensive landowner support networks of forestry and legal services providers. The networks are developed and coordinated by trusted communitybased organizations and include organizations with resources and technical capacities, such as state forestry organizations, nonprofits, universities, and the private sector. The networks leverage the stable funding and technical expertise of the government programs; community trust and innovation of communitybased nonprofits, conservation groups, and universities; and the market access and technical expertise of private industry.

Public-Sector Partners:
Natural Resources Conservation Service, State Forestry Commissions, USDA Forest Service

Other Partners:
University of Arkansas Pine Bluff (AR), Winston County Self Help Cooperative (MS), Limited Resources Landowner Education Assistance Network (AL), Federation of Southern Cooperatives (AL), McIntosh SEED (GA), Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation (SC), Roanoke Electric Cooperative (NC), and Black Family Land Trust (VA).

Contact Information:
(alicia@usendowment.org)

Download the Award Information


Rasmuson Foundation
 
Challenge

Alaska has been experiencing an ongoing housing crisis with little new production of affordable rental housing. Construction is expensive and the cost of living is high — especially in its rural communities. Many Alaskan communities are only accessible by plane or boat, and houses may lack indoor plumbing or flush toilets, making it difficult to recruit and retain essential workforce employees — especially teachers, health professionals, and public safety officers.

Innovation

Alaska Housing Finance Corporation and Rasmuson Foundation began working together 10 years ago to address a void in housing for specific groups: working families, rural professionals, seniors and those at the very edge of society. The result is a unique partnership that has added nearly 1,300 housing units to Alaska’s inventory across 53 developments. Projects are spread across dozens of communities from small, remote villages off the road system to Alaska’s biggest cities.

Since Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) and Rasmuson Foundation began working together in 2008, they have partnered on 53 projects in 31 communities, creating more than 1,300 sorely needed housing units. Rasmuson Foundation has provided direct capital grants and program-related investments totaling $12.25 million into 29 housing developments side-by-side with AHFC’s allocation of Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), HOME Investment Partnership Program funds, state grants and mortgage financing. Rasmuson Foundation also provided $4 million to AHFC to leverage state matching funds. In each case, Rasmuson Foundation provided gap funds necessary to complete the housing project or preserve affordability of units. The funds enabled developers to increase the number of low-income designated and market-rate units as well as add public community spaces, spaces for child care and early education programs, and other family-friendly amenities. Collectively, the partners increased housing starts and developed new multifamily housing projects, and generated more than $400 million in construction activity.

Public-Sector Partners:
Alaska Housing Finance Corporation; two dozen cities, tribes and tribal entities, and school districts

Other Partners:
Cook Inlet Housing Authority, Volunteers of America Alaska, Bethel Community Services Foundation, and numerous other nonprofit housing developers

Contact Information:
Chris Perez (cperez@rasmuson.org)

Download the Award Information


Michael Reese Health Trust (MRHT) and Polk Bros. Foundation (PBF)
 
Challenge

In 2014, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, in collaboration with the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, chose Chicago and Cook County as the first major U.S. metropolitan area to implement a healthcare and housing initiative.

Innovation

As part of the planning process, MRHT convened 45 stakeholders, including state, county, and city representatives and leadership of the nine managed care organizations (MCOs) that at that time insured Illinois Medicaid enrollees. Together the group outlined goals that would ensure that people who experience homelessness and chronic health issues have stable housing and coordinated services that lead to improved health and healthcare cost reductions.

With the support of MRHT and PBF, the Center for Housing and Health (CHH) recruited lead partner agencies and launched the Chicago and Cook County Housing for Health Strategic Plan (H2). CHH recruited an unprecedented cross-sector leadership council comprised of city, county, state, federal, and managed care leaders, nonprofit housing and advocacy organizations, and foundation leaders. With significant input from more than 250 stakeholders, the group developed a three-year strategic plan with three primary goals: create additional housing opportunities for people experiencing homelessness; share data across the housing and health systems; and provide cross-sector training and coordination. The leadership council, currently chaired by Chicago’s Public Health Commissioner, meets biannually. Three stakeholder workgroups each developed a set of deliverables and meet regularly to implement activities to meet the overarching goals.

Public-Sector Partners:
Over a dozen public sector partners, including local government, education, health, and housing partners

Other Partners:
Many partners, including foundations, nonprofits, and community groups

Contact Information:
Rachel Reichlin and Debbie Reznick (RReichlin@HealthTrust.net, DReznick@PolkBrosFdn.org)

Download the Award Information


The Spartanburg County Foundation
 
Challenge

The Northside was once a thriving mill community. When Spartan Mills closed, many left the neighborhood resulting in vacant housing stock, lack of economic opportunity, and increased crime.

Innovation

In 2008, Virginia-based Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine announced it would locate its Carolinas Campus at the former Spartan Mills site, providing a catalyst and initial private investment for a larger neighborhood redevelopment. The Northside Development Group was formed in 2011 to spearhead these revitalization efforts. The Northside Development Group developed partnerships with public and private individuals and institutions representing neighborhood residents, governmental agencies, local business, health care, education, nonprofit, and philanthropic sectors.

The Northside Initiative is an effort to fundamentally transform a neighborhood of approximately 400 acres into a community of choice, where current residents choose to stay and new people choose to move. To achieve a neighborhood of choice, the Northside Development Group and its partners are working to create a vibrant cradle to career education pipeline, affordable housing options, and a stable, safe, and healthy environment that supports all stages of life through comprehensive social and community services. The early successes have ignited a new sense of community pride. This initiative is also gaining national recognition. In 2012, the Northside was named the 8th Purpose Built Community, and is currently 1 of 16 communities throughout the United States with this recognition.

Public-Sector Partners:
Over a dozen public sector partners, including local government, education, health, and workforce partners

Other Partners:
Many partners, including foundations, nonprofits, and community groups

Contact Information:
Mary L. Thomas (mthomas@spcf.org)

Download the Award Information


The Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and The Leonard & Helen R. Stulman Foundation
 
Challenge

According to the National Aging in Place Council, over 90% of seniors say they would prefer to age in place instead of moving into senior housing; but there can be a significant gap between that desire and their ability to modify and maintain their homes. In Baltimore City, 17% of all older adults over the age of 65 live below the poverty level. Because older adults are more likely to live on a fixed income and experience limited mobility, they often have substantial unmet housing needs.

Innovation

Housing Upgrades to Benefit Seniors (HUBS) is an innovative initiative created in 2015 to bring Baltimore City stakeholders, both government and nonprofit, in senior housing services together to remove barriers that prevent low income seniors from accessing services they need to age in place. HUBS includes 16 organizations in Baltimore City who work to fill the gap between maintaining healthy housing and independent living for older adults.

The existing Baltimore City Housing backlog of more than 600 low-income older adults waiting—some for as long as three years—to receive vital home repairs to their roofs, furnaces, and hot water heaters underscores the need for consolidated services for older adults. To eliminate this current backlog, and to ensure prompt service moving forward, the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation partnered with the Stulman Foundation (the founding HUBS partner), the Hoffberger Foundation, the City of Baltimore, and numerous organizations to support the expansion of the HUBS program. Specifically, the Weinberg Foundation has committed $3.5 million, which will leverage more than $8 million in additional funding, including City and State dollars, creating a total program budget of nearly $12 million.

Public-Sector Partners:
Baltimore Housing’s Division of Green, Healthy, and Sustainable Homes, Maryland Energy Administration, Baltimore City Health Department.

Other Partners:
Civic Works; Green and Healthy Homes Initiative; Action in Maturity; Banner Neighborhoods; CHAI: Comprehensive Housing Assistance, Inc.; Govans Ecumenical Development Corp.; Keswick Multi-Care; Meals on Wheels; Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore; Rebuilding Together Baltimore; Sinai Hospital Baltimore; Strong City Baltimore

Contact Information:
Aaron Merki (amerki@hjweinberg.org)

Download the Award Information